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Dr. Ian Bruce

Associate Chair (Graduate)

Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

Professor

McMaster School of Biomedical Engineering

Expertise:
Biomedical engineering and signal processing, particularly development of mathematical models of auditory physiology for predicting auditory perception in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired individuals; assistive devices for the hearing impaired such as hearing aids and cochlear implants; auditory neurophysiology and psychophysics; digital speech processing; stochastic and nonlinear systems
Areas of Specialization:
Research Clusters:

Overview

The main interests of my lab are in the areas of biomedical engineering and signal processing applied to the auditory system. The primary application is to use engineering methods to study and model the physiological mechanisms that contribute to hearing loss and tinnitus and to improve assistive devices for the hearing impaired such as hearing aids and cochlear implants and to treat tinnitus.

Ongoing research projects include:

  • Computational modelling of sound processing by the mammalian auditory system
  • Physiologically-based prediction of speech intelligibility and quality
  • Characterizing and modelling noise-induced, age-related, and genetic hearing loss
  • Electrophysiological and behavioural measures of tinnitus and hearing loss
  • Modelling of cochlear implant stimulation of the auditory nerve
  • Model-based evaluation and design of hearing aids and cochlear implants
  • Behavioural, electrophysiological and acoustical evaluation of hearing aids in complex listening environments, including speech and music perception
  • 3D acoustical signal processing

Education

B.Eng. ; Ph.D. (University of Melbourne, Australia)

Did you know…

A paper written by Dr. Ian Bruce, Laurel Carney (Adjunct Professor) and Muhammad Zilany (a former PhD student) is the most-cited paper in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America over the 20 month period from January 2015 to August 2016.

Associate Director of the LIVELab.

Associate Member of the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour.

Former Undergraduate Advisor for the Electrical and Biomedical Engineering program.

Biography

Ian C. Bruce was born in Bendigo, Vic., Australia, in 1969. He received the B.E. (electrical and electronic) degree from The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., in 1991, and the Ph.D. degree from the Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Melbourne.

From 1993 to 1994, he was a Research and Teaching Assistant at the Department of Bioelectricity and Magnetism, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria. He was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA, from 1998 to 2001. Since 2002, he has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, currently at the rank of Professor. His research interests include auditory modeling, hearing aids, cochlear implants, tinnitus, neural coding of speech, digital speech processing, and stochastic processes. He is an Associate Editor of the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America.

Dr. Bruce is a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, a Member of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, and a Registered Professional Engineer in Ontario.

Publications

Selected

Boulet, J., White, M., and Bruce, I. C. (2016)

Temporal considerations for stimulating spiral ganglion neurons with cochlear implants

Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology 17(1):1–17

Zilany, M. S. A., Bruce, I. C., and Carney, L. H. (2014)

Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 135:283–286

Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 135:283–286

Recognized as the most cited article in JASA for the period Jan. 2015–Aug. 2016

Recent

Bruce, I. C. (2017). "Physiologically based predictors of speech intelligibility," Acoustics Today Spring 2017 Issue 13(1):28–35. http://html5.dcatalog.com/?docid=ffefc205-6370-4722-be0b-a735012920c5#page=30

Boulet, J., and Bruce, I. C. (2017). "Predictions of the contribution of HCN half-maximal activation potential heterogeneity to variability in intrinsic adaptation of spiral ganglion neurons," Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology 18(2):301–322. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10162-016-0605-5

Moncada-Torres, A., van Wieringen, A., Bruce, I. C., Wouters, J., and Francart, T. (2017). "Predicting phoneme and word recognition in noise using a computational model of the auditory periphery," Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 141:300–312. http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4973569

Paul, B. T., Bruce, I. C., and Roberts, L. E. (2017). "Evidence that hidden hearing loss underlies amplitude modulation encoding deficits in individuals with and without tinnitus," Hearing Research 344:170–182. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2016.11.010

Seeber, B. U. and Bruce, I. C. (2016). "The history and future of neural modeling for cochlear implants," Network: Computation in Neural System 27(2–3):53–66, Special Issue on "Computational modelling of cochlear implants". http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0954898X.2016.1223365

Takanen, M., Bruce, I. C., and Seeber, B. U. (2016). "Phenomenological modelling of electrically stimulated auditory nerve fibers: A review," Network: Computation in Neural System 27(2–3):157–185, Special Issue on "Computational modelling of cochlear implants". http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0954898X.2016.1219412

Boulet, J., White, M., and Bruce, I. C. (2016). "Temporal considerations for stimulating spiral ganglion neurons with cochlear implants," Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology 17(1):1–17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10162-015-0545-5

Roberts, L.E., Bosnyak, D. J., Bruce, I. C., Gander, P. E., and Paul, B. T. (2015). "Evidence for differential modulation of primary and nonprimary auditory cortex by forward masking in tinnitus," Hearing Research 327:9–27. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2015.04.011

Negm, M. H., and Bruce, I. C. (2014). "The effects of HCN and KLT ion channels on adaptation and refractoriness in a stochastic auditory nerve model," IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering 61(11):2749–2759. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TBME.2014.2327055

Hove, M. J., Marie, C., Bruce, I. C., and Trainor, L. J. (2014). "Superior time perception for lower musical pitch explains why bass-ranged instruments lay down musical rhythms," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111(28):10383–10388. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1402039111

Paul, B. T., Bruce, I. C., Bosnyak, D. J., Thompson, D. C., and Roberts, L.E. (2014). "Modulation of electrocortical brain activity by attention in individuals with and without tinnitus," Neural Plasticity 2014, Article ID 127824, 16 pages, Special Issue "Plasticity of Neural Systems in Tinnitus". http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/127824

Zeyl, T. J., and Bruce, I. C. (2014). "Analysis of spatiotemporal pattern correction using a computational model of the auditory periphery," Ear & Hearing 35(2):246–255. http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AUD.0b013e3182a4a6f9

Trainor, L. J., Marie, C., Bruce, I. C., Bidelman, G. M. (2014). "Explaining the high voice superiority effect in polyphonic music: Evidence from cortical evoked potentials and peripheral auditory models," Hearing Research 308:60–70, Special Issue "Music: A window into the hearing brain". http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2013.07.014

Zilany, M. S. A., Bruce, I. C., and Carney, L. H. (2014). "Updated parameters and expanded simulation options for a model of the auditory periphery," Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 135:283–286. http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4837815

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Achievements

Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America

P.Eng.

Visiting Scientist and Associated Partner of the European Union Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) on Improved Communication through Applied Hearing Research “ICanHear” (2013–2016);

Mind To Market Award from Ontario Centres of Excellence (2012)

Visiting Researcher in the Equipe Audition, Ecole normale supérieure, Paris, France (2012)

Visiting Scholar at The Bionic Ear Institute, Melbourne, Australia (2009–2010)

Visiting Scholar in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Australia (2009–2010)

Innovator of Distinction Award from McMaster University (2009)

Barber–Gennum Chair in Information Technology, McMaster University (2002–2006)