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Lydell Wiebe awarded grant from Canadian Institute of Steel ConstructionJune 12, 2018

The Department of Civil Engineering would like to congratulate Dr. Lydell Wiebe on his grant from the Canadian Institute of Steel Construction (CISC) for a project titled "Experimental Validation of Seismically Resilient Concentrically Braced Frames with Replaceable Brace Modules."

Congratulations to Dr. Wiebe, on his grant from the Canadian Institute of Steel Construction (CISC)

Project Title: "Experimental Validation of Seismically Resilient Concentrically Braced Frames with Replaceable Brace Modules."

This project is part of a multi-year effort, with the overall objectives of: (1) replacing field welding with field bolting, (2) avoiding out-of-plane buckling that can cause dangerous damage, and (3) simplifying post-earthquake repairs. This is expected to lead to savings in erection time and fabrication costs, thereby enhancing the competitiveness of steel concentrically braced frames. In this phase of the study, the aim is to conduct large-scale system-level experimental testing to capture the interaction of the replaceable brace modules with the rest of the frame. PhD student Vahid Mohsenzadeh will be conducting these tests in the Applied Dynamics Laboratory.

 

Dr. Wiebe is developing tools and educating people to meet the structural engineering challenges of an urbanizing world. There are two main streams to his research:

Developing economical ways of improving structural performance: this research identifies innovative ways of using traditional materials and construction methods to improve the resilience and sustainability of built infrastructure. There is a particular focus on developing self-centering steel seismic force resisting systems, such as controlled rocking steel braced frames.

Developing appropriate structural modelling tools: this research enables more rational structural design and assessment through improved numerical modelling. While there is a particular focus on refined models that can simulate structural response up to collapse, simplified models are also being developed to provide design-level approximations of key response parameters.