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Formation of Entrapped Microdroplets, Nanoemulsions and Electrical Double Layers

Formation of Entrapped Microdroplets, Nanoemulsions and Electrical Double Layers

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JHE H324

Overview

Interfaces, by definition, occur due to heterogeneity in physical systems, and thus result in unique properties and interactions. For instance, liquid-liquid interfaces tend to minimize interfacial area due to surface tension; liquid-liquid-solid interfaces give rise to the wetting phenomena; and an electrical double layer develops near the surface when electrolyte comes in contact with a charged surface. These phenomena span multiple length and time scales, and are often accompanied by other transport processes such as fluid flow and mass transfer.

In this talk, I will discuss three different systems: entrapment of 100 um droplets inside a channel by exploiting obstacles, formation of emulsions with average droplet size around 100nm, and formation of 1nm (or smaller) electrical double layers when a asymmetric valence electrolyte comes in contact with a charged surface. I will also talk about the application of these results in enhanced oil recovery, pharmaceutics and energy storage.   I will demonstrate that by invoking concepts from multiphase flows and transport phenomena, we can further our understanding about these phenomena that span multiple length and time scales.

Bio

Ankur is currently a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University where he is working with Prof. Howard Stone. Prior to his post-doctoral position, Ankur completed his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he worked with Prof. Patrick S. Doyle and Prof. T. Alan Hatton. During his PhD, he worked on the formation of nanoemulsions and interfacial micro-scale flow around obstacles. Currently, he is working on the broad area of electrokinetics for energy and the environment. His research interests include interfacial phenomena, complex fluids, multiphase flows and electrokinetics.