Professor Rings Up Award for Telecom Work

May 11, 2011

Jamal Deen, professor of electrical and computer engineering, and Senior Canada Research Chair in Information Technology at McMaster University was presented with the 2011 IEEE Canada R.A. Fessenden Award on May 9 at the 24th Canadian Conference on Electrical and Computer Engineering held in Niagara Falls.

The R.A. Fessenden silver medal is presented to outstanding Canadian engineers recognized for their important contributions to the field of telecommunications engineering. The award was established in 2000 to remember the work of Canada’s Reginald Aubrey Fessenden, “the father of radio”, who discovered how to transmit the sound of the human voice without wires.

Prof. Deen was cited for his "pioneering contributions in electronics and optoelectronics for communications." He is one of the world’s leading authorities in modeling and noise of electronic and optoelectronic devices for communication systems. His practical models for high-performance optical detectors and experimental innovations for reliability prediction have contributed to the design and manufacture of reliable photodetectors for fiber optic communications. He has also had considerable success in transferring engineering and circuit models for designing communication circuits to numerous companies.

Prof. Deen is a Fellow of IEEE and seven other societies including The Royal Society of Canada, the American Physical Society (FAPS), and the Electrochemical Society, and is an Honorary Member of the World Innovation Foundation. His other awards include the 2002 Callinan Award from the Electrochemical Society; a Humboldt Research Award from the Humboldt Foundation, Germany in 2006; the Eadie Medal from The Royal Society of Canada in 2008; and the Electronics and Photonics Division (EPD) Award from the Electrochemical Society in 2011. His research record includes approximately 430 peer-reviewed articles, seven best paper awards and six patents used in industry.

Jamal Deen, professor of electrical and computer engineering, and Senior Canada Research Chair in Information Technology

 

The IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) is the world’s largest professional society with over 400,000 members in more than 160 countries.  IEEE Canada is the Canadian arm of IEEE as well as the constituent society of the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC) for the technical fields of electrical, electronics, and computer engineering.

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