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Dr. Lydell Wiebe

B.A.Sc. (Toronto), M.Sc. (ROSE School),
Ph.D. (Toronto)

Office JHE 333
Extension 24620
Email address: wiebel@mcmaster.ca


Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering

Structures and Earthquake Engineering

 

Research Interests

  • Earthquake Engineering
  • Structural Dynamics
  • Nonlinear Dynamic Modelling Techniques
  • Steel Structures
  • Self-Centering Systems

Specific Research Interests and Activities

Dr. Wiebe is developing tools and educating people to meet the structural engineering challenges of an urbanizing world. There are two main streams to his research:

     

  1. Developing economical ways of improving structural performance: this research identifies innovative ways of using traditional materials and construction methods to improve the resilience and sustainability of built infrastructure. There is a particular focus on developing self-centering steel seismic force resisting systems, such as controlled rocking steel frames.
  2. Developing appropriate structural modelling tools: this research enables more rational structural design and assessment through improved numerical modelling. While there is a particular focus on refined models that can simulate structural response up to collapse, simplified models are also being developed to provide design-level approximations of key response parameters.

 

Publications

Journal Articles

  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C, Tremblay R, Leclerc M. 2013. Mechanisms to limit higher mode effects in a controlled rocking steel frame. 1: Concept, modelling, and low-amplitude shake table testing. Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics, 42(7): 1053-1068.
  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C, Tremblay R, Leclerc M. 2013. Mechanisms to limit higher mode effects in a controlled rocking steel frame. 2: Large-amplitude shake table testing. Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics, 42(7): 1069-1096.
  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C. 2011. Using Bezier curves to model gradual stiffness transitions in nonlinear elements: application to self-centering systems. Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics, 40(14): 1535-1552.
  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C. 2010. Characterizing acceleration spikes due to stiffness changes in nonlinear systems. Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics, 39(14): 1653-1670.
  • Wiebe L. Christopoulos C. 2009. Mitigation of higher mode effects in base-rocking systems by using multiple rocking sections. Journal of Earthquake Engineering, 13(SP1): 83-108.

Conference Papers

  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C. 2013. A new performance-based design methodology for controlled rocking steel frames. Proceedings of the 4th ECCOMAS Thematic Conference on Computational Methods in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering (COMPDYN 2013), Kos, Greece.
  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C, Tremblay R, Leclerc M. 2012. Modelling inherent damping for rocking systems: results of large-scale shake table testing. Proceedings of the 15th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Lisbon, Portugal.
  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C, Tremblay R, Leclerc M. 2012. Shake table testing of a rocking steel frame designed to mitigate higher model effects. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Behaviour of Steel Structures in Seismic Areas (STESSA 2012), Santiago, Chile.
  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C. 2010. A critical review of numerically predicted accelerations in nonlinear hysteretic systems. Proceedings of the 9th US and 10th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Toronto, Canada.
  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C, Pampanin S. 2007. Seismic response of self-centering base-rocking steel structures. Proceedings of the 9th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Ottawa, Canada.

Other Publications

  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C. 2011. Accelerations in systems with abrupt stiffness changes. RCI Report No. 2011-03, Centre for the Resilience of Critical Infrastructure, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
  • Wiebe L, Christopoulos C. 2009. Mitigation of higher mode effects in base-rocking systems by using multiple rocking sections. Research Report ROSE 2009/01, Centre for Post-Graduate Training and Research in Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Seismology (ROSE School), Pavia, Italy.